Post WWII curriculum reform—to do Greek or not to do Greek
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 6 Readings

Post WWII curriculum reform—to do Greek or not to do Greek

Kliebard, H. (2004). The struggle for the American curriculum. Ch. 9–10, pp. 200–249. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer. Chapter 9, covers the years during and immediately after World War II and begins data-driven approach then the academic history of previous chapters. Predominantly, the immediate post-war period continued the trend of interest group ideologies, which Kliebard observed … Continue reading

The line between science and pseudoscience
Not Quite Curriculum Theory

The line between science and pseudoscience

Wendel, P. (2007, June). Falsifiability as a science/non-science demarcation criterion in the battle against creationism. Paper presented at the Ninth International History, Philosophy, and Science Teaching Conference, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Wendel (2007 began his analysis with a working definition of the term creationist as “anyone who endorses the theistic creation of the universe … Continue reading

Professionalization of American scientists: public science in the creation/evolution trials.
Not Quite Curriculum Theory

Professionalization of American scientists: public science in the creation/evolution trials.

Gieryn, T., Bevins, G., & Zehr, S. (1985). Professionalization of American scientists: public science in the creation/evolution trials. American Sociological Review, 50(3), 392–409. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095548. Gieryn, Bevins and Zehr (1985), examined two of the earliest and most influential court cases in the history of the United States legal debate, over whether to allow the … Continue reading

Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science
Not Quite Curriculum Theory

Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science

Gieryn, T. (1983). Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science: Strains and interests in professional ideologies of scientists. American Sociological Review, 48, 781–795. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095325. Professor Gieryn’s paper focused on what the author saw as the “problem of demarcation” of science from non-science; specifically how he perceived that scientists had—until the published date … Continue reading