Traditional vs progressive education… either-or?
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 6 Readings

Traditional vs progressive education… either-or?

Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and Education, pp. 17–23, 25–31. New York, NY: Touchstone. Traditional vs. Progressive Education “Mankind likes to think in terms of extreme opposites. It is given to formulating its beliefs in terms of Either-Ors, between which it recognizes no intermediate possibilities.” (p.17) Dewey’s opening statement may fit well for belief, for systems … Continue reading

Dewey, talking sense… and nonsense.
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 6 Readings

Dewey, talking sense… and nonsense.

Dewey, J. (1897). My pedagogic creed. School journal, 54(3), 77–80. ARTICLE ONE. WHAT EDUCATION IS “I believe that all education proceeds by the participation of the individual in the social consciousness of the race. This process begins unconsciously almost at birth, and is continually shaping the individual’s powers, saturating his consciousness, forming his habits, training … Continue reading

Eclecticism and what was progressive education?
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 5 Readings

Eclecticism and what was progressive education?

Kliebard, H. (2004). The struggle for the American curriculum. Ch. 7–8, pp. 151–200. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer. The crisis of the Great Depression, with mass school closures and laying-off of teachers, brought a renewed interest in using education to reform society. Kliebard’s seventh chapter described how, the social meliorist position of blending social efficiency with … Continue reading

Curriculum is politics
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 5 Readings

Curriculum is politics

Curtis, B. (1997). The State of Tutelage in Lower Canada, 1835–1851. History of Education Quarterly, 37(1), 25-43. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/369903. Most of the postmortem examinations of the Canadian Rebellion of 1837-38 identified one of its leading causes as faulty political education… (p. 25) Talking Point: Define education. The British wanted to use education to guard … Continue reading

Duncan McArthur: The history of a civic-minded politician that cared about education. Yes, there really appears to have been one.
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 5 Readings

Duncan McArthur: The history of a civic-minded politician that cared about education. Yes, there really appears to have been one.

Christou, T. (2013). The complexity of intellectual currents: Duncan McArthur and Ontario’s progressivist curriculum reforms. Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, (49)5, 677–697, Doi: 10.1080/00309230.2012.739181 The author described a period of “dramatic reorganisation” (p. 677), from 1937–1938 and 1941–1942, when progressivist reforms were directed amidst a complex reformist agenda, at a time … Continue reading

On Understanding by Design II.
Curriculum Theory

On Understanding by Design II.

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VT: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Chapter 11. The Design Process. (pp. 254-255) Chapter 12. UbD as Curriculum Framework. (pp. 256-301) Appendix: Sample of 6-Page Template. (pp. 327-332) I’ve been interested by the amount of material on Understanding by Design® (UbD) across the web, … Continue reading

Curriculum design according to Ornstein & Hunkins (2009)
Curriculum Theory

Curriculum design according to Ornstein & Hunkins (2009)

Ornstein, A., & Hunkins, F. (2009). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Curriculum Design, pp. 190–206 The authors considered what they argued were three basic themes of curriculum design (1) subject-centered; (2) learner-centered; and (3) problem-centered designs. Subject Centered Design Aside from some re-phrasing, this section remains very similar to the … Continue reading

Conflicting conceptions of curriculum—30 years before Kliebard (2004)
Curriculum Theory

Conflicting conceptions of curriculum—30 years before Kliebard (2004)

Eisner, E., & Vallance, E. (Eds.). (1974). Conflicting conceptions of curriculum. Berkeley, CA: McCutchan Publishing. In the introduction, the authors recognize that the complexity of goals, content and organization of curriculum leads to diverse interpretations and opinions by all stakeholders and to representations by politicians and media. Frequently resulting public controversy. The article then go’s … Continue reading

Doll’s four R’s—An alternative to the Tyler rationale
Curriculum Theory

Doll’s four R’s—An alternative to the Tyler rationale

Doll, W. (2013) The Four R’s – An Alternative to the Tyler Rationale. In: D. J. Flinders & S. J. Thornton (Eds.), Curriculum Studies Reader (4th ed.), pp. 215–222. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer. When I first began reading this paper, I had little sympathy for Mr. Bartlett’s methods of addition, whether he was more “industrially … Continue reading