Counts splits the progressive education movment
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 4 Readings

Counts splits the progressive education movment

Counts, G. (1932). Dare progressive education be progressive? Progressive Education 9(4), 257–263. A collection of three speeches given at the February 1932 meeting of the Progressive Education Association (P.E.A.) in Baltimore, was first published as a pamphlet entitled Dare the School Build a New Social Order? At the time, many perceived an emerging split within … Continue reading

John Dewey, the Dewey School and the vocational path that followed
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 3 Readings

John Dewey, the Dewey School and the vocational path that followed

Kliebard, H. (2004). The struggle for the American curriculum. Ch. 3–4, pp. 51–104. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer. John Dewey’s ideas about education… The Univ. of Chicago, Laboratory School (The Dewey School) opened in 1896. No fully worked out curriculum. Kliebard noted that subjects were described by Albion Small, Head Professor of Social Studies as ”an unorganized … Continue reading

Defining what you know that you don’t know
EDUC-910 Week 3 Readings / Philosophy

Defining what you know that you don’t know

Plato. (1997). Meno (G.M.A. Grube, Trans.). In, Plato: Complete works. J. M. Cooper & D. S. Hutchinson (Eds.), pp. 870–897. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. (Original work published ca. 380 B.C.) This has been my first real exposure to classical Greek philosophy, and as such I’ll apologize to any real scholars of Greek philosophy … Continue reading

Variations in curriculum theory
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 2 Readings

Variations in curriculum theory

Kliebard, H. (2004). The struggle for the American curriculum. Ch. 1–2, pp. 1–50. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer. Kliebard described changes in the perception and the reality of society and the school at the close of the nineteenth century. Kliebard argues that, in the public’s view, changes that had begun earlier in the century, such as the … Continue reading

The nature of curriculum theory—give me a “for instance”
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 2 Readings

The nature of curriculum theory—give me a “for instance”

Kliebard, H., Hawkins, T., Diamonti, M., Tyler, R., Franklin, B., & Bauer, N. (1977). [Curriculum theory: Give me a “for instance”]: Discussion. Curriculum inquiry, 6(4), 277–282. Why does curriculum have to be an applied field of philosophy? Agreed. Parent v. foundation. Foundation grows to become a parent? Hawkins & Diamonti: Curriculum is purely applied theory? … Continue reading

Curriculum theory… can there be only one?
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 2 Readings

Curriculum theory… can there be only one?

Diamonti, M. (1977). Yes, we have no curriculum theory: Response to Herbert Kliebard. Curriculum inquiry, 6(4), 269–276. My scrapbook notes… Kliebard discussed there being a dichotomy of a theorist or a practitioner? Really? Why can’t someone be both? [T]he origins of curriculum as a field of study can be traced to the borrowing of assumptions … Continue reading

Curriculum theory: Give me a “for instance”
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 2 Readings

Curriculum theory: Give me a “for instance”

Kliebard, H. (1977). Curriculum theory: Give me a “for instance”. Curriculum Inquiry, 6(4), 257–269. Herbert Kliebard My scrapbook notes… Kliebard (2004) told us that from 1918–1927 curriculum was on its way, in 1927 it arrived? Define arrived exactly? Western societies had a curriculum before then, well before 1918 we differentiated sciences enough to be well on the way … Continue reading