Doll’s four R’s—An alternative to the Tyler rationale
Curriculum Theory

Doll’s four R’s—An alternative to the Tyler rationale

Doll, W. (2013) The Four R’s – An Alternative to the Tyler Rationale. In: D. J. Flinders & S. J. Thornton (Eds.), Curriculum Studies Reader (4th ed.), pp. 215–222. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer. When I first began reading this paper, I had little sympathy for Mr. Bartlett’s methods of addition, whether he was more “industrially … Continue reading

The line between science and pseudoscience
Not Quite Curriculum Theory

The line between science and pseudoscience

Wendel, P. (2007, June). Falsifiability as a science/non-science demarcation criterion in the battle against creationism. Paper presented at the Ninth International History, Philosophy, and Science Teaching Conference, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Wendel (2007 began his analysis with a working definition of the term creationist as “anyone who endorses the theistic creation of the universe … Continue reading

Professionalization of American scientists: public science in the creation/evolution trials.
Not Quite Curriculum Theory

Professionalization of American scientists: public science in the creation/evolution trials.

Gieryn, T., Bevins, G., & Zehr, S. (1985). Professionalization of American scientists: public science in the creation/evolution trials. American Sociological Review, 50(3), 392–409. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095548. Gieryn, Bevins and Zehr (1985), examined two of the earliest and most influential court cases in the history of the United States legal debate, over whether to allow the … Continue reading

Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science
Not Quite Curriculum Theory

Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science

Gieryn, T. (1983). Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science: Strains and interests in professional ideologies of scientists. American Sociological Review, 48, 781–795. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095325. Professor Gieryn’s paper focused on what the author saw as the “problem of demarcation” of science from non-science; specifically how he perceived that scientists had—until the published date … Continue reading

Popular culture as a pedagogy of pleasure and meaning
Curriculum Theory

Popular culture as a pedagogy of pleasure and meaning

Giroux, H. & Simon, R. (1989). Popular culture as a pedagogy of pleasure and meaning. Popular culture, schooling, and everyday life, pp. 1–29. Retrieved from http://skillscenter.greenwood. How knowledge is produced, exchanged and may be mediated, re-presented or refused in favour of a dominant sociocultural ideology or doctrine, e.g., evolutionary science education in favour of creationism, … Continue reading

Human ecological complexity: Epistemological implications of social networking and emerging curriculum theories
Curriculum Theory

Human ecological complexity: Epistemological implications of social networking and emerging curriculum theories

Gilstrap, D. (2011). Human Ecological Complexity: Epistemological Implications of Social Networking and Emerging Curriculum Theories. Complicity: An International Journal of Complexity and Education. 8(2), 36–51. When I began to read Donald Gilstrap’s (2011) article comparing (human) ecological complexity to aspects of social networking and curriculum theory, I was ambivalent. I expected scientific definitions to be … Continue reading

Social efficiency and Kilpatrick’s project method
Curriculum Theory / EDUC-910 Week 4 Readings

Social efficiency and Kilpatrick’s project method

Kliebard, H. (2004). The struggle for the American curriculum. Ch. 5–6, pp. 105–150. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer. Chapters 5 and 6. Kliebard’s fifth chapter discussed changes in schooling that resulted from the social efficiency movement. The turnaround of one of the key members of The Committee of Ten, who had earlier rejected ideas of ability … Continue reading